Course Syllabus

                    Intro to Calculus

                    Course Outline

                    Mr. Minnier

                    2015-2016


Classroom Expectations – Mathematics is not a spectator sport. In order to be successful you must be willing to work and complete assignments. The following expectations are in place so that everyone will have an opportunity to succeed.

 

Principles

1.     Take responsibility for your own learning

2.     Stay focused on the task at hand.

3.     Have a positive outlook. 

4.     Respect your classmates.

 

Grading – Grades will be determined on a point value basis. A grade can be calculated by taking the points earned divided by the total points. 

 

Tests/Quizzes – The number of points of tests and quizzes will vary. However, they will make up the a large portion of the overall grade that a student earns. Therefore, it is important to properly prepared for them. All major tests and quizzes will be announced. 

 

Homework – Homework will be graded on completeness rather than correctness. Students must show all work and have a final answer in order to receive credit for their homework. Late homework will be given a zero unless there are extenuating circumstances. There could be unannounced homework quizzes. 

 

Other – There will be other in class or out of class projects or assignments throughout the year that will factor into your grade. 

 

Make up work – Students should make up missed assignments as soon as possible after returning to school. A student that is absent the day before a test will be required to take the test. A student who has missed a test will be required to make up the test the day they return. 

 

Final Exam– A cumulative test will be given at the end of the year. 

 

Extra help – Ask as many questions as possible during class. Other students may have the same questions as you. If a student needs help above and beyond class time, they should come in during consultation. Other times can be set up by request. 

 

Mr. Minnier’s contact information:

            School phone: 286 – 3700

            E-mail: minnierm@shikbraves.org

 

 

Intro to Calculus

Topics of Study

 

Section

Topic

 

 

Review

Precalculus 

 

 

 

Chapter 1: Limits and Their Properties

1.2

Finding Limits Graphically and Numerically

1.3

Evaluating Limits Analytically

1.4

Continuity and One-Sided Limits

1.5

Infinite Limits

3.5

Limits at Infinity

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2: Differentiation

2.1

The Derivative and Tangent Line Problem

2.2

Basic Differentiation Rules and Rates of Change

2.3

Product and Quotient Rules and Higher-Order

2.4

The Chain Rule

2.5

Implicit Differentiation

2.6

Related Rates

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3: Applications of Differntiation

3.1

Extrema on an Interval

3.2

Rolle's Theorem and the Mean Value Theorem

3.3

Increasing and Decreasing Functions and the First Derivative Test

3.4

Concavity and the Second Derivative Test

3.6

 A Summary of Curve Sketching

3.7

Optimization Problems

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 4: Integration

4.1

Antiderivatives and Indefinite Integrals

4.2

Area

4.3

Riemann Sums and Definite Integrals

4.4

The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

4.5

Integration by Substitution

4.6

Numerical Integration

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 5: Logarithmic, Exponential, and OtherTranscendental Functions

5.1

The Natural Logarithmic Function: Differentiation

5.2

The Natural Logarithmic Function: Integration

5.3

Inverse Functions

5.4

Exponential Functions: Differntiation and Integration

5.5

Bases Other Than e and Applications

 

 

 

Chapter 6: Applications of Integration

6.1

Area of a Region Between Two Curves

6.2

Volume: The Disk Method