Citing Online Resources

*THIS SECTION HAS BEEN UPDATED TO REFLECT CHANGES IN MLA FORMAT 8TH EDITION

INFORMATION FOR THIS SECTION CAN BE SEEN ONLINE @ PURDUE OWL

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/


CITING ELECTRONIC RESOURCES

*MLA now requires the www. address; eliminate all https:// when citing URLs.


Internet sites – such as information databases, scholarly projects, etc. vary significantly in the publication information they provide.  Below is the suggested order for documentation.  If you cannot find some of this information, cite what is available in the following order:

  1. Author’s last name, first name.  Place a period after the author’s first name.

  2. Article name in quotation marks " "

  3. Title of the website, project, or book,  Italicized.

  4. Version or edition (ed.), revisions, posting dates, volumes (vol.), or issue numbers (no.).

  5. Publisher information, including the publisher name and publishing date.

  6. Take note of any page numbers (p. or pp.) or paragraph numbers (par. or pars.).

  7. URL (without the https://)  DOI or permalink.

  8. Date of access—the date you looked at the material (day, month, year).

Example:

Burrell, Allison. “Even in the IPhone Age, School Librarians Are a Vital Link to Learning:” PennLive.com, PA Media Group,                /www.pennlive.com/opinion/2016/10/even_in_the_iphone_age_school.html. Accessed 7 March 2017. 


  • It is a good idea to list the date of access, because web pages are often updated.
  • If the publisher is the same as the website name, list it only once.
  • To cite articles from online databases (e.g. LexisNexis, ProQuest, JSTOR, ScienceDirect), provide the title of the database italicized before the DOI or URL. If a DOI is not provided, use the URL instead. Provide the date of access if you wish.
  • Many scholarly journal articles found in databases include a DOI (digital object identifier). If a DOI is available, cite the DOI number instead of the URL.



The Purdue OWL. Purdue U Writing Lab, 2016.